Albéric Magnard

Albéric Magnard (1865-1914)

Nationality: French
Born: June 9, 1865, Paris Died: September 3, 1914, Baron, Oise (age 49)

Quintet for Piano and Winds in d minor, Op. 8 (for flute, oboe, clarinet, bassoon and piano)

(for flute, oboe, clarinet, bassoon and piano)
10:08 I. Sombre
7:29 II. Tendre
5:43 III. Léger
10:45 IV. Joyeux
Duration: 35 minutes (approximately)
Composed: 1894 (age 28-29)
Published: 1904 (age 38-39)
Dedication: Octave Maus
2 recordings, 8 videos
autoopen autoplay
8:15
Les Vents Français
I. Sombre
7:37
Les Vents Français
II. Tendre
5:13
Les Vents Français
III. Léger
10:46
Les Vents Français
IV. Joyeux
10:50
Ensemble Initium
I. Sombre
7:13
Ensemble Initium
II. Tendre
5:50
Ensemble Initium
III. Léger
10:41
Ensemble Initium
IV. Joyeux
From Edition Silvertrust

Albéric Magnard Albéric Magnard (1865-1914) was born in Paris to wealthy parents. His father François Magnard was a bestselling author and editor of the Paris newspaper Le Figaro. After military service and graduating from law school, he entered the Paris Conservatoire, where he studied counterpoint with Théodore Dubois, Jules Massenet and Vincent d'Indy. Magnard's musical output numbered only 22 works with opus numbers. Larger compositions such as symphonies were his main area of interest, however, he did write a piano trio, this string quartet and some instrumental sonatas. Magnard's musical style is typical of French composers contemporaneous to him, but occasionally, there are passages that foreshadow the music of Gustav Mahler. Magnard's use of cyclical form was influenced by César Franck

His Quintet for Piano and Winds dates from 1894. It is a big work painted a broad canvas. The first movement, Sombre, shows the influence of Debussy as well as some of the lush tonalities of the late Romantics. Beginning almost in mid-phrase, it is anything but somber. Rather it is light and impassioned. There is considerable tension, including a fugal section in the middle before the movement calmly concludes. The second movement Tendre, on the other hand is somber, beginning with a long meditative duo between the clarinet and the piano. The Leger, which follows, fulfills the function of a scherzo and trio, sounding as if written by a latter day French Mendelssohn, beginning at first in a spooky mood before brightening. The finale, Joyeux, begins resolutely and sound almost like battle music, making a boisterous and triumphant conclusion to the work.

Virtually impossible to obtain for many years, we are pleased to make this first class quartet available once more. It should certainly be on the list of repertoire of works for winds and piano.

© Edition Silvertrust. Used by permission. All rights reserved.

Related Composers

1900 WWI WWII César Franck (1822-1890) Théodore Dubois (1837-1924) Jules Massenet (1842-1912) Gabriel Fauré (1845-1924) Vincent d'Indy (1851-1931) Ernest Chausson (1855-1899) Claude Debussy (1862-1918) Guy Ropartz (1864-1955) Albéric Magnard (1865-1914) Maurice Ravel (1875-1937)
Théodore Dubois (1837-1924)
Teacher
Nationality: French
Born: August 24, 1837, Rosnay, Marne Died: June 11, 1924, Paris (age 86)
Jules Massenet (1842-1912)
Teacher
Nationality: French
Born: May 12, 1842, Montaud, St Etienne Died: August 13, 1912, Paris (age 70)
Vincent d'Indy (1851-1931)
Teacher
Nationality: French
Born: March 27, 1851, Paris Died: December 2, 1931, Paris (age 80)
Guy Ropartz (1864-1955)
Friend/Colleague
Nationality: French
Born: June 15, 1864, Guingamp, Côtes du Nord Died: November 22, 1955, Lanloup, Côtes du Nord (age 91)