featured on these lists

All Listed Works Edition Silvertrust
Franz Krommer

Franz Krommer (1759-1831)

Nationality: Czech | Moravian
Born: November 27, 1759, Kamenice u Třebíče Died: January 8, 1831, Vienna (age 71)

String Quartet in A major, Op. 7, No. 3

(for 2 violins, viola and cello)
6:56 I. Allegro
5:17 II. Menuetto. Allegretto
4:58 III. Adagio
5:40 IV. Rondo
Duration: 22 minutes (approximately)
Published: 1797 (age 37-38)
1 recordings, 4 videos
autoopen autoplay
6:56
Authentic Quartet
I. Allegro
5:17
Authentic Quartet
II. Menuetto. Allegretto
4:58
Authentic Quartet
III. Adagio
5:40
Authentic Quartet
IV. Rondo
From Edition Silvertrust

Franz Krommer“Franz Krommer of Vienna is not only an outstandingly good violinist but also one of the best loved composers as witnessed by the number of copies of his works which have been printed and gone through several editions. Mr Krommer boasts such a wealth of original ideas, wit, fire, novel harmonic turns that he will easily attract and capture the attention of quartet lovers now that Haydn’s name is no longer to be found in the list of new published works.”

—–Neues historisch-Lexikon der Tonkunstler. (The New Historical Dictionary of Composers, 1805)

Franz Krommer (1759-1831) was born in town of Kamnitz then part of the Habsburg Austrian Empire (today Kamenice in the Czech Republic) It had a mixed population of Germans and Czechs and though baptized František Vincenc Kramář by the time he was 15, Krommer began using the Germanized version of his name for the rest of his life, the name by which he became known to the world. Krommer was one of the most successful composers in Vienna at the turn of the 18th Century. His reputation was attested to by the fact that his works were frequently republished throughout Germany, England, France, Italy, Scandinavia and even the United States. According to several contemporary sources he was regarded with Haydn as the leading composer of string quartets and as a serious rival of Beethoven.

Krommer was a violinist of considerable ability who came to Vienna around 1785. For the following 10 years he held appointments at various aristocratic courts in Hungary. He returned to Vienna in 1795 where he remained until his death, holding various positions including that of Court Composer (Hofmusiker) to the Emperor, Franz I, an enthusiastic quartet player. He was the last composer to hold this august title and one of his duties was accompanying the Emperor on his various campaigns so that he could relax in the evenings playing quartets. There are more than 300 compositions which were at one time or another published, much of which is chamber music. He wrote more than 70 string quartets, 35 quintets, perhaps as many as 15 string trios, but also several works for winds and strings. There are more than 300 compositions which were at one time or another published, much of which is chamber music. He wrote more than 70 string quartets, 35 quintets, perhaps as many as 15 string trios, but also several works for winds and strings. Of Krommer's string quartets, the famous chamber music critic Wilhelm Altmann, in his Handbook for String Quartet Players writes, “Krommer knew how to write for string instruments and as a result what he wrote sounds brilliant.”

String Quartet Op.7 No.3 in A Major is the last of a set of three dating from 1797. These quartets served to establish his name and reputation throughout Europe. They were originally printed by Gomberg in Augsburg, the by Andre in Offenbach, then in France, Denmark and even the United States. The opening movement, Allegro, begins with a series of down notes which serve as the first part of the main theme. Soon the cello and first violin engage in a to and fro. Long series of triplets a la Mozart enliven the rest of the movement. A Haydnesque Menuetto which comes next is typically Viennese. But the trio is quite original. Here the cello starts off with a series upward notes and is immediately answered by the first violin. The effect is of mini recitative. The third movement, Adagio, is a theme and set of variations. The theme is noble but and quite leisurely. However, the variations are filled with filigree and ornaments as well as tempo changes which hold the listener’s interest. The finale, Rondo, is lively and dance-like.

© Edition Silvertrust. Used by permission. All rights reserved.