Hans von Koessler

Hans von Koessler (1853-1926)

Nationality: German | Hungarian
Born: January 1, 1853, Waldeck, Fichtelgebirge Died: May 23, 1926, Ansbach (age 73)

Trio-Suite (for violin, viola and piano)

(for violin, viola and piano)
10:23 I. Adagio - Allegro
4:10 II. Romanze. Adagio non troppo
4:00 III. Gavotte
6:50 IV. Finale. Vivace
Duration: 25 minutes (approximately)
Published: 1922 (age 68-69)
1 recordings, 4 videos
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10:23
David Frühwirth, et. al.
I. Adagio - Allegro
4:10
David Frühwirth, et. al.
II. Romanze. Adagio non troppo
4:00
David Frühwirth, et. al.
III. Gavotte
6:50
David Frühwirth, et. al.
IV. Finale. Vivace
From Edition Silvertrust

Hans Koessler Hans Koessler (1853-1926) is a master composer who wrote some of the most outstanding music that you have never heard. An injustice, but one which we, with the republication of this fine work, hope will begin to remedy this situation. Koessler was born in Waldbeck in upper Bavaria. He studied organ and composition with Joseph Rheinberger in Munich. He held a number of positions in Germany before finally taking up the position of Professor of Organ, Composition and Choral direction at the Music Academy of Budapest in the early 1880's. He stayed there until his retirement in 1908. Bartók, Kodály, Dohnanyi, Leo Weiner and Imre Kalman were all among his many students and he was widely regarded as the finest teacher of composition in Austria-Hungary during the 1890's and the first part of the 20th century. Though primarily a composer of vocal works and opera, he did write a number of superb chamber works including two string quartets, a string quintet, and a sextet along with his Trio Suite for Piano, Violin and Viola.

Koessler's works were never catalogued and were often published, like the Trio Suite, without any opus number. The Trio Suite was dedicated to his student and friend Ernst von Dohnanyi and published in 1922 toward the end of his life but was believed to have been composed around 1919. The highly respected chamber music critic, Wilhelm Altmann, wrote about the Trio Suite as follows:

The Trio Suite is eminently suitable for performance. Furthermore, given that Koessler composed it when he was sixty-six years old, it is astonishing proof of his youthfulness and intellectual vigor. It would be very popular in concert halls if it were to be performed. Koessler, a classicist who considered himself a follower of Brahms, nonetheless surprises us with daring modulations which Brahms himself would never have ventured to write let alone think of. The opening Allegro is written on a grand scale with lovely themes--including a very Hungarian dance--and a very effective coda. The second movement, Romanze, is filled with sentiment and emotion. Koessler follows this up with a delightful, gay Gavotte. The finale, Vivace, is full of attractive themes which are warm-blooded and distinctive.

We believe there are few if any works for this combination which can match the excellence of Koessler's Trio Suite. In fact, we feel it is simply too good to deprive standard piano trio groups of this music and have therefore have included an alternative cello part, in lieu of the viola. Thus for the first time, standard piano trios can now enjoy this work. We feel certain Koessler would have approved.

© Edition Silvertrust. Used by permission. All rights reserved.


Related Composers

1900 WWI WWII Josef Rheinberger (1839-1901) Hans von Koessler (1853-1926) Ernő Dohnányi (1877-1960) Béla Bartók (1881-1945) Zoltán Kodály (1882-1967) Leó Weiner (1885-1960)
Béla Bartók (1881-1945)
Student
Nationality: Hungarian
Born: March 25, 1881, Nagyszentmiklós, Hungary Died: September 26, 1945, New York City, NY (age 64)
Josef Rheinberger (1839-1901)
Teacher
Nationality: German
Born: March 17, 1839, Vaduz, Liechtenstein Died: November 25, 1901, Munich (age 62)
Zoltán Kodály (1882-1967)
Student
Nationality: Hungarian
Born: December 16, 1882, Kecskemét Died: March 6, 1967, Budapest (age 84)
Ernő Dohnányi (1877-1960)
Student
Nationality: Hungarian
Born: July 27, 1877, Pozsony (now Bratislava) Died: February 9, 1960, New York (age 82)
Leó Weiner (1885-1960)
Student
Nationality: Hungarian
Born: April 16, 1885, Budapest Died: September 13, 1960, Budapest (age 75)