Johann Hummel

Johann Hummel (1778-1837)

Nationality: Austrian
Born: November 14, 1778, Pressburg (now Bratislava) Died: October 17, 1837, Weimar (age 58)

Cello Sonata in A major, Op. 104

9:52 I. Allegro amabile e grazioso
5:19 II. Romanze. Un poco adagio e con espressione
6:03 III. Rondo. Allegro vivace un poco
Duration: 20 minutes (approximately)
Composed: 1824 (age 45-46)
Published: c. 1826 (age 47-48)
Dedication: Grand Duchess Maria Pavlovna
3 recordings, 9 videos
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11:04
Martin Rummel, Christopher Hinterhuber
I. Allegro amabile e grazioso
5:19
Martin Rummel, Christopher Hinterhuber
II. Romanze. Un poco adagio e con espressione
6:54
Martin Rummel, Christopher Hinterhuber
III. Rondo. Allegro vivace un poco
9:20
Juraj Alexander, Alexander Cattarino
I. Allegro amabile e grazioso
5:18
Juraj Alexander, Alexander Cattarino
II. Romanze. Un poco adagio e con espressione
5:34
Juraj Alexander, Alexander Cattarino
III. Rondo. Allegro vivace un poco
9:40
Dmitri Sokolov, Yuri Martynov
I. Allegro amabile e grazioso
5:21
Dmitri Sokolov, Yuri Martynov
II. Romanze. Un poco adagio e con espressione
6:10
Dmitri Sokolov, Yuri Martynov
III. Rondo. Allegro vivace un poco
From Edition Silvertrust

Johann Nepomuk Hummel Johann Nepomuk Hummel (1778-1837) was not only considered one of the most important composers of his time but was also widely regarded as the greatest piano virtuoso of his era. Today, among composers of his generation, only Beethoven's works can be ranked higher. Stylistically, Hummel's music generally represents the end of the Viennese Classical Era and the bridge period between it and Romanticism.

However, his cello sonata completed in 1825, clearly belongs to the Romantic rather than Classical Era. The graceful Cello Sonata in A major is romantic, spacious and immediately attractive. In the opening Allegro amabile, the music glides along with the cello expressively ‘singing’ over a rippling piano accompaniment. The lovely middle movement, Romanza, shows an affinity with early Beethoven while the extroverted finale, which has a tinge of a Hungarian rondo. The exciting coda provides an exuberant ending.

Our edition is based on the late 19th century edition made by the famous cellist Friedrich Grutzmacher, however, we have added rehearsal numbers and corrected mistakes. There are very few cello sonatas from the early romantic period and cellists will find this a welcome addition.

© Edition Silvertrust. Used by permission. All rights reserved.