Karl Goldmark

Karl Goldmark (1830-1915)

Nationality: Hungarian
Born: May 18, 1830, Keszthely Died: January 2, 1915, Vienna (age 84)

String Quintet in a minor, Op. 9

(for 2 violins, viola and 2 cellos)
14:27 I. Allegro molto
8:46 II. Andante con moto - Allegro moderato
4:42 III. Allegro molto
9:25 IV. Andante sostenuto - Allegro
Duration: 38 minutes (approximately)
Composed: 1862 (age 31-32)
Published: 1870, Vienna: J.P. Gotthard (age 39-40)
Dedication: Herrn Fr. Erkel The Royal Hungarian General Music Director
1 recordings, 4 videos
autoopen autoplay
12:51
Lajtha String Quartet, Lazlo Mezo
I. Allegro molto
8:58
Lajtha String Quartet, Lazlo Mezo
II. Andante con moto - Allegro moderato
5:07
Lajtha String Quartet, Lazlo Mezo
III. Allegro molto
9:39
Lajtha String Quartet, Lazlo Mezo
IV. Andante sostenuto - Allegro
From Edition Silvertrust

Carl Goldmark "The Op.9 String Quintet is a mature work of masterly construction and may be regarded as one of Goldmark's finest chamber works." So wrote the respected critic Rudolf Felber in his article on Goldmark in Cobbett's Cyclopedic Survey of Chamber Music.

Carl Goldmark (1830-1915) was born in the town of Keszthely in Austria-Hungary. His early musical training was at the conservatories in Sopron and Odenburg. His father then sent him to Vienna where he briefly studied violin under two of the better known teachers, Leopold Jansa and Joseph Böhm. As a composer, however, Goldmark was largely self-taught.

World-wide fame came to him with the performance of his opera The Queen of Sheba. He wrote in most genres and many of his other compositions, such as his Violin Concerto and the Rustic Wedding Symphony, were quite popular during his lifetime and for several years thereafter. Brahms was to become a good friend but Goldmark's chamber music does not show much of that composer's influence. Rather, one sometimes hears an interesting mix of Mendelssohn and Schumann often seasoned with lively Hungarian gypsy melodies.

The String Quintet dates from 1870 and is certainly one of the best in the literature for this combination. Felber describes of the Quintet as follows:

The opening Allegro reveals fresh invention and wealth of imagination; here the composers characteristic tendency to Oriental coloring already appears. The first theme, full of pathos and the meditative second theme provide an excellent contrast. There is also a third theme—all three are splendidly developed. The end of this movement is particularly beautiful and the skillful interweaving of the parts makes a deep impression. The deeply emotional second movement, Andante con moto, shows the influence of Mendelssohn. The third movement is a gay Scherzo. In the finale begins in a funereal vein with a substantial, Andante sostenuto, introduction. But the main part of the movement, Allegro, is lively and high-spirited.

Long out of print, we are pleased to reintroduce this fine work which not only deserves concert performance but will also be a great pleasure to amateurs.

In addition, we are pleased to offer this Quintet in a version for 2 Violins, Violas, Cello and Bass. Our bass part was made by Anthony Scelba, noted bass soloist, Professor of Music and Director of the Concert Artists Program of Kean University. Professor Scelba has created an idiomatic bass part that adds breadth and clarity to the timbral spectrum of the work, making it a welcome addition to the double bass chamber music repertoire.

© Edition Silvertrust. Used by permission. All rights reserved.


Related Composers

1900 WWI Karl Goldmark (1830-1915) Rubin Goldmark (1872-1936)
Rubin Goldmark (1872-1936)
nephew
Nationality: American
Born: August 15, 1872, New York Died: March 6, 1936, New York (age 63)