Max Bruch

Max Bruch (1838-1920)

Nationality: German
Born: January 6, 1838, Cologne Died: October 2, 1920, Berlin (age 82)

String Quartet No. 2 in E major, Op. 10

(for 2 violins, viola and cello)
9:33 I. Allegro maestoso, un poco pìu vivo
6:27 II. Andante quasi adagio
5:45 III. Vivace ma non troppo
6:21 IV. Finale. Vivace
Duration: 28 minutes (approximately)
Composed: 1860 (age 21-22)
Published: 1861, Leipzig: Breitkopf und Härtel (age 22-23)
2 recordings, 8 videos
autoopen autoplay
9:38
Academica String Quartet
I. Allegro maestoso, un poco pìu vivo
6:37
Academica String Quartet
II. Andante quasi adagio
6:01
Academica String Quartet
III. Vivace ma non troppo
6:10
Academica String Quartet
IV. Finale. Vivace
9:28
Diogenes Quartet
I. Allegro maestoso, un poco pìu vivo
6:17
Diogenes Quartet
II. Andante quasi adagio
5:28
Diogenes Quartet
III. Vivace ma non troppo
6:31
Diogenes Quartet
IV. Finale. Vivace
From Edition Silvertrust

Max Bruch Max Bruch's two string were written in his youth when Mendelssohn was his guiding light. String Quartet No.2 dates from 1861.

Writing in Cobbett's Cyclopedic Survey of Chamber Music, Wilhelm Altmann, the respected chamber music critic notes that all of Bruch's chamber music is distinguished by its beauty of tone. The Second Quartet is particularly effective. The themes to the opening movement, Allegro maestoso, is full of vigor and sport a Mendelssohnian aura. The breadth of the movement approaches the orchestral. A slow movement, Andante quasi adagio, follows. It begins as a simple song, but Bruch exhibits a mastery of form in the wealth of elaboration with which he treats it. The middle section provides a particularly fine contrast. The main theme of the scherzo-like third movement, Vivace ma non troppo, has a very powerful and original rhythm which carries all before it. There are two fine trios, the first smooth and flowing, the second also with an unusual rhythm. The lively finale, Vivace, moves forward with great élan to conclude what is a first rate work, particularly so for a young man of 23.

Max Bruch (1838-1920) enjoyed a long and fruitful career as a composer, conductor and teacher. He studied with Ferdinand Hiller and his talent was recognized early on by Schumann and Ignaz Moscheles. Today, Bruch is primarily remembered for his fine violin concertos and his choral works. However, as Altmann notes, his chamber music is beautiful and deserving of performance.

© Edition Silvertrust. Used by permission. All rights reserved.


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