Nikolai Myaskovsky

Nikolai Myaskovsky (1881-1950)

Nationality: Russian | Soviet
Born: April 20, 1881, Modlin, Poland Died: August 8, 1950, Moscow (age 69)

Cello Sonata No. 1 in D major, Op. 12

(for cello and piano)
8:05 I. Adagio - Andante
14:05 II. Allegro passionate - Adagio
Duration: 19 minutes (approximately)
Composed: 1911 (age 29-30)
Revised: 1945 (age 63-64)
4 recordings, 7 videos
autoopen autoplay
8:05
Ina-Esther Joost Ben-Sasson, Allan Sternfield
I. Adagio - Andante
14:05
Ina-Esther Joost Ben-Sasson, Allan Sternfield
II. Allegro passionate - Adagio
23:09
Marina Tarasova, Alexandr Polezhaev
9:38
Rudin, Ginsburg
(part 1 of 2)
9:15
Rudin, Ginsburg
(part 2 of 2)
9:07
Rovner, Ito
(part 1 of 2)
10:44
Rovner, Ito
(part 2 of 2)
From Edition Silvertrust

Nikolai Myaskovsky Nikolai Myaskovsky (1881-1950) was born in Congress (i.e. Russian) Poland near Warsaw, where his father, a military engineer was then serving. He took piano and violin lessons as a boy but followed in his father's footsteps, entering the military academy and graduating as an engineer. When he was posted to Moscow, he studied composition with Reinhold Glière. Upon transfer to St. Petersburg, he finally decided to become a composer and entered the St. Petersburg Conservatory where he studied with Rimsky-Korsakov and Liadov. It was there he met Prokofiev with whom he became close friends. He served in WWI and was severely wounded on the Austrian front. After the war, he taught for most of his life at the Moscow Conservatory. Among his many students were Kabalevsky, Khachaturian, Shebalin and Shchedrin. He wrote in virtually every genre leaving some 27 symphonies and 13 string quartets, along with numerous instrumental sonatas. Myaskovsky has to be one of the most underrated composers of the 20th century. Most who come to his music for the first time are amazed that it is not better known.

His First Cello Sonata was composed in 1911 immediately after he graduated from the St. Petersburg Conservatory. It is in two movements which are closely related thematically. It represents the beginning of Myaskovsky from modernism. He himself wrote that both Tchaikovsky and Rachmaninov influenced him. The opening movement, Adagio-Andante, opens with a slow, majestic theme, slightly tinged with Russian overtones. The andante is not much faster and in a seamless continuation of the adagio. A dark and more passionate section comes after this. The second movement. Allegro appassionato, begins full of passion high in the cello's tenor register. It's searching motif rises to considerable dramatic heights.

This is an absolutely first class work which will also be a success in the recital hall and will also appeal greatly to amateur cellists everywhere.

© Edition Silvertrust. Used by permission. All rights reserved.

Related Composers

1900 2000 WWI WWII Nikolai Rimsky-Korsakov (1844-1908) Reinhold Glière (1875-1956) Nikolai Myaskovsky (1881-1950) Vissarion Shebalin (1902-1963) Aram Khachaturian (1903-1978) Dmitri Kabalevsky (1904-1987) German Galynin (1922-1966) Rodion Shchedrin (born 1932)
Nikolai Rimsky-Korsakov (1844-1908)
Teacher
Nationality: Russian
Born: March 18, 1844, Tikhvin Died: June 21, 1908, Lyubensk (age 64)
Reinhold Glière (1875-1956)
Teacher
Nationality: Russian | Soviet
Born: January 11, 1875, Kiev Died: June 23, 1956, Moscow (age 81)
Dmitri Kabalevsky (1904-1987)
Student
Nationality: Russian | Soviet
Born: December 30, 1904, St. Petersburg Died: February 18, 1987, Moscow (age 82)
Aram Khachaturian (1903-1978)
Student
Nationality: Armenian | Soviet
Born: June 6, 1903, Tbilisi Died: May 1, 1978, Moscow (age 74)
Vissarion Shebalin (1902-1963)
Student
Nationality: Russian | Soviet
Born: June 11, 1902, Omsk Died: May 29, 1963, Moscow (age 60)
Rodion Shchedrin (born 1932)
Student
Nationality: Russian | Soviet
Born: December 16, 1932, Moscow (age 88)
German Galynin (1922-1966)
Student
Nationality: Russian | Soviet
Born: March 30, 1922, Tula Died: July 18, 1966, Moscow (age 44)