Jean  Huré

Jean Huré (1877-1930)

Nationality: French
Born: September 17, 1877, Gien
Died: January 27, 1930, Paris (age 52)
wikipedia

Piano Quintet in D major

(for 2 violins, viola, cello and piano)
Allegro quasi pastorella
Composed: between 1907-1908 (age 30-31)
Published: 1913 (age 35-36)
Dedication: Georges Enesco
Duration: 30 minutes (approximately)
1 recording
30:50
Carla Marrero Martinez, Pablo Fernandez Gonzalez, Assia Weissmann, Martijn Dendievel, Jose Andres Navarro Silberstein

From Silvertrust:

Jean Huré Jean Huré (1877-1930) in the French town of Gien. He received his initial musical training at the École St-Maurille in Angers and served as organist at the cathedral in the city. In 1895 he went to Paris. There he was advised by the famous organist Charles-Marie Widor to study at the Paris Conservatory but Huré preferred to go his own way and never studied at any Conservatory. He primarily supported himself by serving as an organist at various churches in Paris. He wrote in most genres but was especially fond of chamber music writing several instrumental sonatas, two string quartets, this piano quintet and a piano trio.

Huré wrote his Quintet for Piano, Two Violins, Viola and Cello in 1907-08, dedicating it to his friend George Enescu who played the first violin part at the premiere in Paris, on 23 May 1912. Although no key is indicated, it is clearly in D major. Laid out in a single movement, it is divided into two large sections linked by an interlude but seems more like a vast poem driven by a dense network of cyclic motifs. One notices the influences of Celtic Impressionism, which is apparent in the modality and melodic-rhythmic contours of the main themes.

This is an entirely original work by a composer who remained independent and outside of the influences of the composers of the French musical establishment of the time such as Fauré or d'Indy. A powerful work which deserves to be heard where it is sure to make a strong impression.

© Silvertrust. Used by permission. All rights reserved.

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